Why phrase “pass the QA” makes me cringe

Today I heard someone say “pass the QA” and in this post I will share why I believe that we should cross out this phrase from all dictionaries where it is included because it is just wrong use of definitions.

Let’s break this phrase into two parts: QA and pass.

What is QA?
I am talking here in a sense of quality assurance. Okay, that sounds clear, however, what is quality assurance?

A lot of people mix up QA and testing on a daily basis. There have been various discussions about it and I mostly lean towards the point of Michael Bolton in his post Testers: Get Out of the Quality Assurance Business. It was an eye opener blog post for me: my first job as a tester even had it in the title “Software Quality Assurance Analyst”. Later on, I turned into QA Engineer. However, I am a tester.

Michael Bolton in that blog post gives so many valid points, it’s like a gold mine. It is one of my favorite ever posts about testing. It basically stresses that as a tester you cannot really assure quality. You just inspect it and help to improve it. You test.

QA is not a person or the department of certain type of professionals. It is a task of everyone in the company to work towards assuring quality. Tester may play a huge part in it, but the actual “action” assurers of quality usually are programmers because they actually are making changes to the quality level. And, let’s not forget the main part:

Assuring quality is an ongoing task/goal of the company.

What does it mean to pass?

In testing passing the test means that the test has passed based on its acceptance criteria.

Test may be built from multiple specific test cases or lead by charters. However, the defined acceptance criteria should be clear.

Passing of tests could be related to the common question in testing: how much is it enough to test? Sometimes the answer is not that obvious. There may be various scenarios, explorations to be made and a common standard should be discussed with product management team on what are the requirements and if edge cases should be addressed for the initial release/iteration.

Why don’t I like the phrase “pass the QA”?

After explaining both parts of this phrase, I can say that for me saying “pass the quality assurance” makes almost no sense.

Quality assuring is an ongoing task, so it is never going to end. You cannot pass the quality assurance as it is, but you can pass the test.

I do understand the intent of this phrase and why it was used: it was meant to say that testing will be completed with no show-stopper issues and will pass the acceptance criteria.

Let’s not underestimate the power of wording. Saying “pass the QA” can definitely be misleading. However, sad news are that this term is quite popular to describe the teams of testers. In this case, let’s spread the awareness of the differences between QA and testing – we all are doing QA in the company, but only testers do testing as their full time job (programmers do a fair deal of testing as well, but it is not their main responsibility usually).

 

 

 

Rebirth as an Omega Tester

Last time I wrote an entry in this blog was 2 years ago. Definitely, a lot has changed and it’s time for a rebirth.

Reasons why I got silent were simple: I got tired at my work, it became monotonous and lacking of challenges (later reasons became simpler: I forgot about the blog, it was not a habit anymore and I was pretty busy).

More than a year ago, I decided to look for a new job. With a bit of luck and accidents, I stumbled upon an ad for a first full-time software tester in a startup. As I have met all of the requirements and job sounded challenging enough, I just had to apply even if it was based in other country (where I have never been before).

Response was quick and inspiring: I got homework (I always think it’s a great sign of a company – you can prove yourself with actual task). After that, I had multiple Skype interviews and… quit my job (which is definitely a tough thing to do when it’s your first job), packed my bags and moved to a new land of opportunities.

I must tell you that this change was the happiest change in my life. Now it’s more than a year that I work as an only full-time tester in a promising and exciting startup! I have many stories to share, so, it’s about time to make a rebirth.

Changing from manual tester executing test scripts in a big international company to being a sole tester in a (sometimes chaotic) startup is a huge difference, but, oh boy, how worth it is! Advice for you:

If you ever wake up at least a couple of days in a week thinking “I don’t like my work and don’t want to go there” – it’s about time to change your work. New opportunities are around the corner waiting for you.

And, if you find yourself wondering, why did I call myself an Omega tester, there is a great article by James Bach: Omega Tester: Testing with a Team One. Definitely worth reading it!