In the land of bugs or why you shouldn’t blame yourself for missing a bug

2 months that I’m a software tester. I have learned a lot, but there is a lot of other things to be learned. 

In the previous post I was talking about the relationship between developers and testers. Now, I think it’s time to talk about problems with other testers, and, inner hurricanes of emotions. 

You won’t catch all bugs. It may sound sad, it may break your perfectionist’s heart, and, on some level, you realize that you will never be perfect at your job… However, this is the beauty of being a tester – there is no comfort zone. The learning is constant and sometimes it does hurt. Sometimes you do shout on yourself and regret not checking something. 

There are pluses and minuses of working in a team of testers with testing cycles. I must admit that some testers make me bitter by skipping quite important bugs. They just seem to ‘float on the surface’ of the test plan and don’t put too much of attention in actually finding bugs. But… it’s good to work in a team and get the same thing tested by several people. This prevents possible major bugs of being unnoticed. 

It breaks my heart when the test plan I did before and all its bugs got fixed, fails for some other tester. I feel like I did not notice something, or, did not put too much of importance to something. However, there are a few main things to remember why you shouldn’t be angry on yourself for letting the bug pass unnoticed:

New builds may cause trouble.
You shouldn’t blame yourself for not finding something that was not even alive in a previous build. Things happen, and, sometimes, by trying to fix something – we ruin something else. 

Importance of the bug is subjective. 
Of course, you should write down everything. However, at times the bug seems so tiny, that you consider it as a feature. You simply take it that it works this way. For example, you may think that in that application hyperlink does not get created automatically. Then after a while someone else tests the same thing and files the bug about it. It gets fixed. The feeling is not too good as you were aware of it, but thought that it’s not important (as there was an obvious workaround and manual creation). 

In conclusion, bugs are everywhere. There are lots of bugs, but you must know which ones are the most important and must be fixed for this release. And, I found this lovely quote in a book called Testing Computer Software by Cem Kaner, Jack Falk,and, Hung Q. Nguyen: 
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